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Azealia Banks Slams Dolce & Gabbana for being Racist (PHOTOS)

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Azealia Banks - if she's not beefing with another emcee, she's frolicking with the fashion crowd. Now, the hip hop diva's two worlds are starting to overlap, as her latest beef is with fashion royalty Dolce & Gabbana.

 "Whoever designed that racist a** Dolce and Gabanna [sic] collection needs a swift kick in the mouth and a big [expletive] up the a**," Banks lividly tweeted.  

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Dolce & Gabbana's spring 2013 collection angered many folks last month during Milan Fashion Week, with their "Moorish" imagery displayed on their dresses and earrings. The earrings, which were the most controversial, depict the head of a black woman with a scarf on her head and bright pink lips; many have compared the earring to the notorious "blackface."  

 

Reuters
Reuters

"Definitely boycotting Dolce & Gabanna," tweeted Banks. However, she seems to be a month late on this news. Plenty of fashion lovers and professionals alike were disgusted by the designs.

After the tremendous amount of backlash, Dolce & Gabbana defended their design in an article posted on their website Swide.com. The designers explained the historical and cultural background of the figures.  "The head is inspired by Moorish features," the article reads. "Moorish is a term used to define many peoples throughout history. Medieval and early modern Europeans applied the name to the Berbers, Arabs, Muslim Iberians and West Africans. In Sicily's case it defines the conquerors of Sicily [from 827 to 902 AD.]" The brand continued defending their design, arguing that the earrings are "a unique piece of history and art."

 

Reuters
Reuters

Dolce & Gabbana also relayed a legend in which a young girl who fell in love with a "Moor" and beheaded him and used his head as a flower vase.

The designers argued that the "Moor" heads are common in homes, hotels, and restaurants in Sicily-a city that continues to inspire their work.

While this situation may be just another dilemma of cultural differences; Banks does not see the history or artistic context justifiable.

"I really hate when people do corny, racist things then try to justify it as 'art,'" the "212" rapper tweeted.

She continued, "It's all just really unnecessary. The clothes in the collection were fine without all the "black mammie" imagery."

Banks is still new to the fashion scene and has been considered a muse to a few designers. Despite being a newbie, the gutsy rap star tells it how she sees it -- even if that means she won't be invited to the next fashion show.

Do you agree with Azealia Banks?

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